Friday, February 27, 2009

Dare to be Dev D

Dear Blogdosts. I am NOT being lazy. I wanted to share this with you, because it has generated a lot of comment - good and bad. Dev D is an important film in terms of what it is saying.... the rules it has broken. This column appeared last week in 'The Week'.
Ever since Aham initiated the Sita Sena, my inbox has been full and I am finding it hard to repond to each mail individually. Something good must come out of this. Something good has to start somewhere. Because we live in Mumbai, it is happening here. But the concern is not restricted to geography. It is a universal threat that has to be met. Pepper sprays and karate kicks are not the answer. I hate the idea of women being compelled to defend themselves. We have the right to live and act freely. The constitution guarantees as much. Whether or not Aham succeeds in getting the numbers at Gateway on the 8th of March, at least there is some awareness his actions will generate through the peaceful protest against what is going on in our society under the guise of 'teaching women a lesson.'

Dare to be Dev D

Now here’s a film that slipped into movie halls without too much of a band baaja, and has the urban, multiplex moviegoer gasping for breath. Most cinemabuffs cannot believe they are being ‘allowed’ to watch such a bold film in the first place, and without the lunatic fringe threatening to vandalise theatres screening it – oops, I hope I haven’t spoken too soon. Since the debate du jour revolves around these self-appointed moral scouts looking for evidence that nails culprits who defy their notions of ‘Bharatiya Sanskriti’, this film should be made compulsory viewing for the likes of them. Their arteries may pop, but with any luck their eyes will openas well as to what’s really going on in our metros, and how nobody is blinking! Here’s a 21st century version of Sarat Chandra’s classic, ‘Devdas’, which was first published in 1917. Anurag Kashyap’s interpretation is so wild and original, it takes a second viewing to register. Bollywood is finally waking up, coming of age and experimenting with terrain that is risqué, out there and outrageous. We all know the basic Devdas story. It revolves around an obsessive hero, who doesn’t have the guts to marry his true love, and chooses to drown his sorrow in a bottle…. till he meets the proverbial prostitute with a heart of gold, who loves him unconditionally, and puts up with his petulant crap. I have never understood people’s fascination for Devdas – I think of him as the ultimate loser. A self-pitying, weak and morose guy, who has only himself to blame. But Anurag’s version of this loser is far more layered and therefore more compelling. Abhay Deol has been given the credit for inspiring Kashyap to remake the classic in this dark and sinister mould. Deol stars as the protagonist, and delivers a competent performance. But the really riveting acts come from the two newcomers who play Paro (Mahie) and Chandramukhi ( Kalki ) respectively. There is nothing long- suffering about this spirited Paro, and as for Kalki, she gives phone sex in multiple languages in one key scene, with such ease, it’s disturbing. The film explores and exposes the grittiest aspect of Delhi’s seedy Paharganj district in cinema verite style. But it is when the camera closes in on the faces of the two women, that the film maker delivers that devastating punch in the gut. It is a ferocious portrayal of twisted lives gone horribly wrong. Dev descends into living hell as he abuses his body , subjecting it to a combination of drugs, booze and demeaning sex. Chanda (Kalki) as a garishly made up child prostitute, catering to kinky , game- playing, sado-masochistic clients, doesn’t flinch even once as she goes through the motions and mouths dialogues where she describes herself as a ‘randi’ and wonders aloud why society hesitates to use that word and prefers the euphemism of ‘commercial sex worker’ to its cruder, more direct version. Paro is sexually aggressive, an unabashed predator, who thinks nothing of emailing her bare breasted images to Dev while he’s in London, or strapping a mattress to the seat of her bicycle and setting up a tryst with her lover in the middle of a sugarcane field. Both the women are entirely upfront about their sexuality and have no inhibitions expressing their voracious desires, or using their bodies commercially (Paro who opts for an arranged marriage and dutifully sleeps with a husband she does not love, Kalki who cold- bloodedly trades her physical assets in order to continue her college education). This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema, which for all its synthetic attempts at depicting today’s free thinking women still does not have the guts to show the heroine as anything but a vestal virgin. But here are these two actresses breaking hypocritical boundaries with boundless gusto and yet doing so with enormous grace and dignity. When Chanda calls Dev a ‘slut’, it is meant as a compliment. The language used throughout the film is raw, contemporary and lethal. But you don’t squirm, because you know instinctively it rings true. This is life on the edge, with all its perverse traps and hideous denouements.Dev D socks it to the audience. The women come out on top – sexually, literally, metaphorically. Good on you, Anurag. Attn: Renjith, Stan, Lukosem The Sexes 16th Feb 2009

Dare to be Dev D

Now here’s a film that slipped into movie halls without too much of a band baaja, and has the urban, multiplex moviegoer gasping for breath. Most cinemabuffs cannot believe they are being ‘allowed’ to watch such a bold film in the first place, and without the lunatic fringe threatening to vandalise theatres screening it – oops, I hope I haven’t spoken too soon. Since the debate du jour revolves around these self-appointed moral scouts looking for evidence that nails culprits who defy their notions of ‘Bharatiya Sanskriti’, this film should be made compulsory viewing for the likes of them. Their arteries may pop, but with any luck their eyes will openas well as to what’s really going on in our metros, and how nobody is blinking! Here’s a 21st century version of Sarat Chandra’s classic, ‘Devdas’, which was first published in 1917. Anurag Kashyap’s interpretation is so wild and original, it takes a second viewing to register. Bollywood is finally waking up, coming of age and experimenting with terrain that is risqué, out there and outrageous. We all know the basic Devdas story. It revolves around an obsessive hero, who doesn’t have the guts to marry his true love, and chooses to drown his sorrow in a bottle…. till he meets the proverbial prostitute with a heart of gold, who loves him unconditionally, and puts up with his petulant crap. I have never understood people’s fascination for Devdas – I think of him as the ultimate loser. A self-pitying, weak and morose guy, who has only himself to blame. But Anurag’s version of this loser is far more layered and therefore more compelling. Abhay Deol has been given the credit for inspiring Kashyap to remake the classic in this dark and sinister mould. Deol stars as the protagonist, and delivers a competent performance. But the really riveting acts come from the two newcomers who play Paro (Mahie) and Chandramukhi ( Kalki ) respectively. There is nothing long- suffering about this spirited Paro, and as for Kalki, she gives phone sex in multiple languages in one key scene, with such ease, it’s disturbing. The film explores and exposes the grittiest aspect of Delhi’s seedy Paharganj district in cinema verite style. But it is when the camera closes in on the faces of the two women, that the film maker delivers that devastating punch in the gut. It is a ferocious portrayal of twisted lives gone horribly wrong. Dev descends into living hell as he abuses his body , subjecting it to a combination of drugs, booze and demeaning sex. Chanda (Kalki) as a garishly made up child prostitute, catering to kinky , game- playing, sado-masochistic clients, doesn’t flinch even once as she goes through the motions and mouths dialogues where she describes herself as a ‘randi’ and wonders aloud why society hesitates to use that word and prefers the euphemism of ‘commercial sex worker’ to its cruder, more direct version. Paro is sexually aggressive, an unabashed predator, who thinks nothing of emailing her bare breasted images to Dev while he’s in London, or strapping a mattress to the seat of her bicycle and setting up a tryst with her lover in the middle of a sugarcane field. Both the women are entirely upfront about their sexuality and have no inhibitions expressing their voracious desires, or using their bodies commercially (Paro who opts for an arranged marriage and dutifully sleeps with a husband she does not love, Kalki who cold- bloodedly trades her physical assets in order to continue her college education). This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema, which for all its synthetic attempts at depicting today’s free thinking women still does not have the guts to show the heroine as anything but a vestal virgin. But here are these two actresses breaking hypocritical boundaries with boundless gusto and yet doing so with enormous grace and dignity. When Chanda calls Dev a ‘slut’, it is meant as a compliment. The language used throughout the film is raw, contemporary and lethal. But you don’t squirm, because you know instinctively it rings true. This is life on the edge, with all its perverse traps and hideous denouements.Dev D socks it to the audience. The women come out on top – sexually, literally, metaphorically. Good on you, Anurag.
Attn: Renjith, Stan, Lukosem The Sexes 16th Feb 2009

Dare to be Dev D

Now here’s a film that slipped into movie halls without too much of a band baaja, and has the urban, multiplex moviegoer gasping for breath. Most cinemabuffs cannot believe they are being ‘allowed’ to watch such a bold film in the first place, and without the lunatic fringe threatening to vandalise theatres screening it – oops, I hope I haven’t spoken too soon. Since the debate du jour revolves around these self-appointed moral scouts looking for evidence that nails culprits who defy their notions of ‘Bharatiya Sanskriti’, this film should be made compulsory viewing for the likes of them. Their arteries may pop, but with any luck their eyes will openas well as to what’s really going on in our metros, and how nobody is blinking! Here’s a 21st century version of Sarat Chandra’s classic, ‘Devdas’, which was first published in 1917. Anurag Kashyap’s interpretation is so wild and original, it takes a second viewing to register. Bollywood is finally waking up, coming of age and experimenting with terrain that is risqué, out there and outrageous. We all know the basic Devdas story. It revolves around an obsessive hero, who doesn’t have the guts to marry his true love, and chooses to drown his sorrow in a bottle…. till he meets the proverbial prostitute with a heart of gold, who loves him unconditionally, and puts up with his petulant crap. I have never understood people’s fascination for Devdas – I think of him as the ultimate loser. A self-pitying, weak and morose guy, who has only himself to blame. But Anurag’s version of this loser is far more layered and therefore more compelling. Abhay Deol has been given the credit for inspiring Kashyap to remake the classic in this dark and sinister mould. Deol stars as the protagonist, and delivers a competent performance. But the really riveting acts come from the two newcomers who play Paro (Mahie) and Chandramukhi ( Kalki ) respectively. There is nothing long- suffering about this spirited Paro, and as for Kalki, she gives phone sex in multiple languages in one key scene, with such ease, it’s disturbing. The film explores and exposes the grittiest aspect of Delhi’s seedy Paharganj district in cinema verite style. But it is when the camera closes in on the faces of the two women, that the film maker delivers that devastating punch in the gut. It is a ferocious portrayal of twisted lives gone horribly wrong. Dev descends into living hell as he abuses his body , subjecting it to a combination of drugs, booze and demeaning sex. Chanda (Kalki) as a garishly made up child prostitute, catering to kinky , game- playing, sado-masochistic clients, doesn’t flinch even once as she goes through the motions and mouths dialogues where she describes herself as a ‘randi’ and wonders aloud why society hesitates to use that word and prefers the euphemism of ‘commercial sex worker’ to its cruder, more direct version. Paro is sexually aggressive, an unabashed predator, who thinks nothing of emailing her bare breasted images to Dev while he’s in London, or strapping a mattress to the seat of her bicycle and setting up a tryst with her lover in the middle of a sugarcane field. Both the women are entirely upfront about their sexuality and have no inhibitions expressing their voracious desires, or using their bodies commercially (Paro who opts for an arranged marriage and dutifully sleeps with a husband she does not love, Kalki who cold- bloodedly trades her physical assets in order to continue her college education). This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema, which for all its synthetic attempts at depicting today’s free thinking women still does not have the guts to show the heroine as anything but a vestal virgin. But here are these two actresses breaking hypocritical boundaries with boundless gusto and yet doing so with enormous grace and dignity. When Chanda calls Dev a ‘slut’, it is meant as a compliment. The language used throughout the film is raw, contemporary and lethal. But you don’t squirm, because you know instinctively it rings true. This is life on the edge, with all its perverse traps and hideous denouements.Dev D socks it to the audience. The women come out on top – sexually, literally, metaphorically. Good on you, Anurag.
Attn: Renjith, Stan, Lukosem The Sexes 16th Feb 2009

Dare to be Dev D

Now here’s a film that slipped into movie halls without too much of a band baaja, and has the urban, multiplex moviegoer gasping for breath. Most cinemabuffs cannot believe they are being ‘allowed’ to watch such a bold film in the first place, and without the lunatic fringe threatening to vandalise theatres screening it – oops, I hope I haven’t spoken too soon. Since the debate du jour revolves around these self-appointed moral scouts looking for evidence that nails culprits who defy their notions of ‘Bharatiya Sanskriti’, this film should be made compulsory viewing for the likes of them. Their arteries may pop, but with any luck their eyes will openas well as to what’s really going on in our metros, and how nobody is blinking! Here’s a 21st century version of Sarat Chandra’s classic, ‘Devdas’, which was first published in 1917. Anurag Kashyap’s interpretation is so wild and original, it takes a second viewing to register. Bollywood is finally waking up, coming of age and experimenting with terrain that is risqué, out there and outrageous. We all know the basic Devdas story. It revolves around an obsessive hero, who doesn’t have the guts to marry his true love, and chooses to drown his sorrow in a bottle…. till he meets the proverbial prostitute with a heart of gold, who loves him unconditionally, and puts up with his petulant crap. I have never understood people’s fascination for Devdas – I think of him as the ultimate loser. A self-pitying, weak and morose guy, who has only himself to blame. But Anurag’s version of this loser is far more layered and therefore more compelling. Abhay Deol has been given the credit for inspiring Kashyap to remake the classic in this dark and sinister mould. Deol stars as the protagonist, and delivers a competent performance. But the really riveting acts come from the two newcomers who play Paro (Mahie) and Chandramukhi ( Kalki ) respectively. There is nothing long- suffering about this spirited Paro, and as for Kalki, she gives phone sex in multiple languages in one key scene, with such ease, it’s disturbing. The film explores and exposes the grittiest aspect of Delhi’s seedy Paharganj district in cinema verite style. But it is when the camera closes in on the faces of the two women, that the film maker delivers that devastating punch in the gut. It is a ferocious portrayal of twisted lives gone horribly wrong. Dev descends into living hell as he abuses his body , subjecting it to a combination of drugs, booze and demeaning sex. Chanda (Kalki) as a garishly made up child prostitute, catering to kinky , game- playing, sado-masochistic clients, doesn’t flinch even once as she goes through the motions and mouths dialogues where she describes herself as a ‘randi’ and wonders aloud why society hesitates to use that word and prefers the euphemism of ‘commercial sex worker’ to its cruder, more direct version. Paro is sexually aggressive, an unabashed predator, who thinks nothing of emailing her bare breasted images to Dev while he’s in London, or strapping a mattress to the seat of her bicycle and setting up a tryst with her lover in the middle of a sugarcane field. Both the women are entirely upfront about their sexuality and have no inhibitions expressing their voracious desires, or using their bodies commercially (Paro who opts for an arranged marriage and dutifully sleeps with a husband she does not love, Kalki who cold- bloodedly trades her physical assets in order to continue her college education). This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema, which for all its synthetic attempts at depicting today’s free thinking women still does not have the guts to show the heroine as anything but a vestal virgin. But here are these two actresses breaking hypocritical boundaries with boundless gusto and yet doing so with enormous grace and dignity. When Chanda calls Dev a ‘slut’, it is meant as a compliment. The language used throughout the film is raw, contemporary and lethal. But you don’t squirm, because you know instinctively it rings true. This is life on the edge, with all its perverse traps and hideous denouements.Dev D socks it to the audience. The women come out on top – sexually, literally, metaphorically. Good on you, Anurag.
Attn: Renjith, Stan, Lukosem The Sexes 16th Feb 2009

Dare to be Dev D

Now here’s a film that slipped into movie halls without too much of a band baaja, and has the urban, multiplex moviegoer gasping for breath. Most cinemabuffs cannot believe they are being ‘allowed’ to watch such a bold film in the first place, and without the lunatic fringe threatening to vandalise theatres screening it – oops, I hope I haven’t spoken too soon. Since the debate du jour revolves around these self-appointed moral scouts looking for evidence that nails culprits who defy their notions of ‘Bharatiya Sanskriti’, this film should be made compulsory viewing for the likes of them. Their arteries may pop, but with any luck their eyes will openas well as to what’s really going on in our metros, and how nobody is blinking! Here’s a 21st century version of Sarat Chandra’s classic, ‘Devdas’, which was first published in 1917. Anurag Kashyap’s interpretation is so wild and original, it takes a second viewing to register. Bollywood is finally waking up, coming of age and experimenting with terrain that is risqué, out there and outrageous. We all know the basic Devdas story. It revolves around an obsessive hero, who doesn’t have the guts to marry his true love, and chooses to drown his sorrow in a bottle…. till he meets the proverbial prostitute with a heart of gold, who loves him unconditionally, and puts up with his petulant crap. I have never understood people’s fascination for Devdas – I think of him as the ultimate loser. A self-pitying, weak and morose guy, who has only himself to blame. But Anurag’s version of this loser is far more layered and therefore more compelling. Abhay Deol has been given the credit for inspiring Kashyap to remake the classic in this dark and sinister mould. Deol stars as the protagonist, and delivers a competent performance. But the really riveting acts come from the two newcomers who play Paro (Mahie) and Chandramukhi ( Kalki ) respectively. There is nothing long- suffering about this spirited Paro, and as for Kalki, she gives phone sex in multiple languages in one key scene, with such ease, it’s disturbing. The film explores and exposes the grittiest aspect of Delhi’s seedy Paharganj district in cinema verite style. But it is when the camera closes in on the faces of the two women, that the film maker delivers that devastating punch in the gut. It is a ferocious portrayal of twisted lives gone horribly wrong. Dev descends into living hell as he abuses his body , subjecting it to a combination of drugs, booze and demeaning sex. Chanda (Kalki) as a garishly made up child prostitute, catering to kinky , game- playing, sado-masochistic clients, doesn’t flinch even once as she goes through the motions and mouths dialogues where she describes herself as a ‘randi’ and wonders aloud why society hesitates to use that word and prefers the euphemism of ‘commercial sex worker’ to its cruder, more direct version. Paro is sexually aggressive, an unabashed predator, who thinks nothing of emailing her bare breasted images to Dev while he’s in London, or strapping a mattress to the seat of her bicycle and setting up a tryst with her lover in the middle of a sugarcane field. Both the women are entirely upfront about their sexuality and have no inhibitions expressing their voracious desires, or using their bodies commercially (Paro who opts for an arranged marriage and dutifully sleeps with a husband she does not love, Kalki who cold- bloodedly trades her physical assets in order to continue her college education). This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema, which for all its synthetic attempts at depicting today’s free thinking women still does not have the guts to show the heroine as anything but a vestal virgin. But here are these two actresses breaking hypocritical boundaries with boundless gusto and yet doing so with enormous grace and dignity. When Chanda calls Dev a ‘slut’, it is meant as a compliment. The language used throughout the film is raw, contemporary and lethal. But you don’t squirm, because you know instinctively it rings true. This is life on the edge, with all its perverse traps and hideous denouements.Dev D socks it to the audience. The women come out on top – sexually, literally, metaphorically. Good on you, Anurag.
Attn: Renjith, Stan, Lukosem The Sexes 16th Feb 2009

Dare to be Dev D

Now here’s a film that slipped into movie halls without too much of a band baaja, and has the urban, multiplex moviegoer gasping for breath. Most cinemabuffs cannot believe they are being ‘allowed’ to watch such a bold film in the first place, and without the lunatic fringe threatening to vandalise theatres screening it – oops, I hope I haven’t spoken too soon. Since the debate du jour revolves around these self-appointed moral scouts looking for evidence that nails culprits who defy their notions of ‘Bharatiya Sanskriti’, this film should be made compulsory viewing for the likes of them. Their arteries may pop, but with any luck their eyes will openas well as to what’s really going on in our metros, and how nobody is blinking! Here’s a 21st century version of Sarat Chandra’s classic, ‘Devdas’, which was first published in 1917. Anurag Kashyap’s interpretation is so wild and original, it takes a second viewing to register. Bollywood is finally waking up, coming of age and experimenting with terrain that is risqué, out there and outrageous. We all know the basic Devdas story. It revolves around an obsessive hero, who doesn’t have the guts to marry his true love, and chooses to drown his sorrow in a bottle…. till he meets the proverbial prostitute with a heart of gold, who loves him unconditionally, and puts up with his petulant crap. I have never understood people’s fascination for Devdas – I think of him as the ultimate loser. A self-pitying, weak and morose guy, who has only himself to blame. But Anurag’s version of this loser is far more layered and therefore more compelling. Abhay Deol has been given the credit for inspiring Kashyap to remake the classic in this dark and sinister mould. Deol stars as the protagonist, and delivers a competent performance. But the really riveting acts come from the two newcomers who play Paro (Mahie) and Chandramukhi ( Kalki ) respectively. There is nothing long- suffering about this spirited Paro, and as for Kalki, she gives phone sex in multiple languages in one key scene, with such ease, it’s disturbing. The film explores and exposes the grittiest aspect of Delhi’s seedy Paharganj district in cinema verite style. But it is when the camera closes in on the faces of the two women, that the film maker delivers that devastating punch in the gut. It is a ferocious portrayal of twisted lives gone horribly wrong. Dev descends into living hell as he abuses his body , subjecting it to a combination of drugs, booze and demeaning sex. Chanda (Kalki) as a garishly made up child prostitute, catering to kinky , game- playing, sado-masochistic clients, doesn’t flinch even once as she goes through the motions and mouths dialogues where she describes herself as a ‘randi’ and wonders aloud why society hesitates to use that word and prefers the euphemism of ‘commercial sex worker’ to its cruder, more direct version. Paro is sexually aggressive, an unabashed predator, who thinks nothing of emailing her bare breasted images to Dev while he’s in London, or strapping a mattress to the seat of her bicycle and setting up a tryst with her lover in the middle of a sugarcane field. Both the women are entirely upfront about their sexuality and have no inhibitions expressing their voracious desires, or using their bodies commercially (Paro who opts for an arranged marriage and dutifully sleeps with a husband she does not love, Kalki who cold- bloodedly trades her physical assets in order to continue her college education). This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema, which for all its synthetic attempts at depicting today’s free thinking women still does not have the guts to show the heroine as anything but a vestal virgin. But here are these two actresses breaking hypocritical boundaries with boundless gusto and yet doing so with enormous grace and dignity. When Chanda calls Dev a ‘slut’, it is meant as a compliment. The language used throughout the film is raw, contemporary and lethal. But you don’t squirm, because you know instinctively it rings true. This is life on the edge, with all its perverse traps and hideous denouements.Dev D socks it to the audience. The women come out on top – sexually, literally, metaphorically. Good on you, Anurag.

13 comments:

Sidhusaaheb said...

Once the 'shock-value' of the 'boldness' has worn off, the film appears to have little to offer that could do justice to Sarat Chandra's classic.

If the 'culture protection' brigade would leave it alone, the film would probably fail to make much of a mark at the box office.

Rahul S. Nair said...

you can always go back to the post editor and remove the repetitions.

Dev D is a good movie.. I think it took some points from Requiem For A Dream.
But most people who like watching commercial films didn't like the movie, which was a downside. But apart from that i thought the camera work and the direction was also pretty good if you see the other aspects of the film keeping the story line apart.

Onthewingsofadream said...

I loved the movie ..specially when this girl asks another gut to give her keys of the house ...coz dev aya hai ..hehe that was fun ...and when he sas no ..she says ' tujhe na kiya hai kabhi ' ..thats was daring

I actually liked when chanda confronts her mom when she wanted to go out of house ...

Vinita said...

I wouldn't call it mere boldness of film makers who create downright immoral and blasphemous flicks of such mould. it's their insatiable sexual desires and addictions they have sunk deeply into that propel them to come up with ideas as these. Not only they are perverts, they're also zealous in perverting the entire universe.

Vee said...

At last, you acknowledged it. I remember reading not-so-positive review of it last time. Agree, it takes repeat viewing to fathom the intricacies.

Anonymous said...

With time slipping by, Indian film makers are vying with one another while undertaking an expedition to add more and more promiscuous content in movies.

Advocatus Diaboli said...

I Loved this movie especially because it brings out two aspects
(a) times are-a-changing &
(b) Moving on is after all not such a bad idea.

Another Kiran In NYC said...

Havent seen the movie yet, and not sure if I want to. Bhansali rather spoiled it for me in the first instance. Besides I want to keep my memories of a very, very yummylicious real life Abhayster alive in my feeble mind.

Sarat Chandra annoys me. I dont think he wrote great stories. There I said it! This one especially is the pits.

Rhett said...

Right! I just saw Black Friday a few mins ago and both movies by Kashyap are jushht great.

Suman Mukherjee said...

Dear Sobha De,
It is 2.23 am in the morning and I suddenly chanced upon your blog while doing some research work.
It is worth mentioning here that, when I first started my blog a couple of years back, I thought that I was the only exotic species at that time. Now I see lot of blogspots coming up here and there.
Anyway, are you trying to create another Ram Sene in disguise and sensationalize some issues?? Ram Sene was right in the Mangalore Pub incident, only that they have made a mistake by taking law in their own hands. Everyone in a free country has the right to protest against any thing that they do not approve.
I think you should join hands with me to free India of drugs and alcohols. I do not understand why you are bent on making India a Pub Factory. Please do not mistake me as a Ram Sene activist—I like you do not belong to any camp.
Suman Mukherjee
India.
suman2005s@rediffmail.com
www.sumanspeaks.blogspot.com
www.sumanspeakscurrentaffairs.blogspot.com
www.sumanspeaksplus.blogspot.com
www.sumanspeakshealth.blogspot.com
www.sumanspeaksfilms.blogspot.com

Ritu said...

I am not quite sure, three posts behind you bashed the film and now you give it a glowing review. Am I missing something?

Aj said...

"This marks a first for Hindi commercial cinema", Yes, they may actually be showing something which is truthful! But, will it be accepted, that is the question? The stereotype of the Indian woman will still remain the same, any attempts to show her in respect to the film will be utterly shameful. Such a bold caricature as shown in the film may only spur on our country's voyeuristic men to violate their privacy. In no way, can the characters portrayed by the female actors in the film be portrayed as a sign of progressive India! Change will be constant, but change is not always for the better.

Siva Cool said...

A truly motivational and life changing book
This book is really a good book which shows us right path. but i read
one more book named "ONE BOOK FOR LIFE SUCCESS" which is truly
motivational and life changing . .The writer has described in Plain English with lot of examples which is easy to understand...For More
Please watch the videohttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biORjS8ngv0